WELCOME TO THE BEACH, BUT PLEASE DO NOT THROW LITTER INTO THE SEA

Now I go to the beach with gloves and a bag where I collect butts and other litter left by unconscious persons.

Time ago, walking on the beach of #parconaturaledelledunedicorralejo, I saw a man throwing the butt of his cigarette into the sea, as if it was been the most natural thing in the world.

I asked him to pick it up and throw it in the trash bin, or buy a pocket ashtray. He answered me to mind of my own business (he has used definitely offensive terms).

I wonder "how can a person make such a barbaric act?"

"What drives a person to profane such a wonderful place, to show so little respect for nature? "

The #nationalgeografic already argued in 2015 that "from the numerical point of view, cigarette butts are the single most abundant rejection on earth. On a global scale, they are dispersed in the environment more than 10 billion every day. Every single butt can contaminate 3 liters of sea water: the filter is intruded with toxic substances, which take from 5 to 20 years to be disposed of by sea in natural form. "

There seems to be biodegradable butts as well: this does not allows throwing them into the sea.

NO MAS COLILLAS EN EL SUELO!

I like to remember a Spanish organization called "Movimento no más colillas en el suelo" whit almost 16,000 followers on his Facebook page, promoting initiatives that I agree with; one of them is engaging dozens of volunteers to collect cigarette butts for a whole day on the beach at La Barceloneta, in Barcelona.

In only 8 hours, they collect more than 20,000 butts: they fill them with 8 transparent 5 litre containers and deposit them at the entrance to the beach.

Seeing these containers full of butts is disgusting and impacting: the initiative aims to raise awareness of the population, hoping to convince every single smoker who has the responsibility of his cigarettes, and that little is enough to avoid serious damages to the environment.

LADY PAOLA

I read of a lady collecting butts from the beautiful beach of Varigotti, close to my hometown Genoa. Her’s name is Paola, and some Italian newspapers talk about her.

Mrs. Paola made me reflect: now I cannot stand and to turn to the other side when I see waste on the beach.

And she inspired me: now I go to the beach with gloves and a bag where I collect butts and other waste left by unconscious persons.